It is almost indescribable the joy that overwhelms one when one finally rounds off college and bids those walls of routine academic drills good-bye, with a feisty embrace of the adventurous and healthy uncertainty which characterizes learning and development in the professional world. Unfortunately, this joy is immediately eclipsed, for many, by the frustration which accompanies the thought of finding a profitable career path. Therefore, this makes the onslaught of graduation a very emotional and difficult one for most college graduates as a result of the confusion they are faced with when considering their career choices for the future. This article will look at this issue, not with the intent of listing a set of relatively relevant and highly-priced career paths but to create the semblance of what profitable, as a conceptual description, should look like and to teach college graduates how to choose rather than what to choose as the boundaries of profitability are fluid and broader than the narrow definition it often attracts from purely economic and financial viewpoints.

Nevertheless, what does profitable means? Does it merely refer to the financial rewards which are attached to particular career choices? Alternatively, the perks and opportunities for growth and development, which it affords the fresh college graduate. Profitability is that and more. Profitability should cover the entire spectrum of advantages, which cuts across the individual’s social, medical, financial, career development, family, and personal life.

Whatever qualifies as profitable should create a friendly atmosphere where the worker can build lasting relationships, must provide a discernible path to career success for the new college grad, must organize work in such a manner that it allows for balance with personal activities and longings, as well as, family demands so as to ensure a healthy and psychologically balanced worker whose motivation and productivity is unencumbered by unfulfilled personal and family demands. Where the above requirements are met, then such a career path provides the environmental requirements for profitability. Importantly, the college grad must show love, aptitude, passion, and drive for the job. Only then can the career path be genuinely profitable to the individual. If the individual lacks the aptitude for the job, then there is a huge possibility that he would find no satisfaction on the job and will most likely feel frustrated, more often than not, more so; if the individual has no love nor passion for the job and is only on the career for the financial gratification which accompanies the job, over time, the individual will become frustrated when money is no longer a problem and fulfillment and happiness becomes the number one need.

Therefore, the argument is that while financial security is essential, it should be regarded as one of the least important factors to consider when considering career profitability. The career’s internal environments must be conducive enough to ensure individual contribution to a productive endeavor and a sense of belonging. In contrast, the internal factors particular to the individual must align with the designs and demands of the career. Where there is a confluence of the afore listed factors, then the individual is bound to enjoy a profitable career.

CategoryEducation
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